Setting the Scene and Outlying the Issues
Beginning of conference - Plenary sessions
09:00
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09:35
Official Opening and Welcome
Chair : Jean-François Morin (Eurofins)
09:05
Welcome by Eurofins
Rodolphe Labal (Eurofins Food France)
09:10
Welcome by Nantes Métropole
Nantes Metrople's President or her representative (Nantes Métropole)
09:15
Welcome by European Commission, DG RTD
Razvan Anistoroaei (DG RTD, European Commission)
09:20
Delivering real world solutions: the role of the FoodIntegrity project
Paul Brereton (Queen's University of Belfast, UK)
For the conclusion of this five-year research and innovation work, the FoodIntegrity project is organising its 5th conference focusing on “Delivering real world solutions”.
This multi-disciplinary conference will offer keynote lectures and panels on the main innovative topics in food integrity. Solutions to be implemented in the food sector will be presented. High-level Key note speakers will debate current issues and provide insight on the future fight against food fraud.
Over 400 attendees are expected from the food processing industry, food retailers, food safety agencies, and public administration and research organisations.
An exciting programme including: poster sessions, workshops, awards, tasting / instruments demo sessions, vendor seminars and an extensive social program (including a conference dinner in an exclusive location) will be taking place over the 1.5 days of the conference.
On behalf of the FoodIntegrity project, the entire Eurofins Nantes testing campus staff and leaders are very excited to organise this event and look forward to welcoming you in Nantes!
09:35
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10:30
Session 1
Strategic look from the big players
Co-chairs : Beate Kettlitz (FoodDrinkEurope) & Michèle Lees (FI Advisory Board)
09:35
Food fraud at the Sharp End – Reliance on Science?
Peter Whelan (FSAI, Ireland)
10:00
Role of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in countering food fraud
Elke Anklam (European Commission- JRC, Belgium)
The objective of this session is to give participants the point of view of enforcement bodies and policy makers on recent advances and further progress against food fraud. Learning from past crises as well as implementation of new standards and regulations will be addressed. Speakers will illustrate some of the major changes that have been made in how the food industry addresses the integrity of the food chain.
10:30
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11:00
Coffee Break in Poster area
11:00
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12:30
Session 2
"Hot" Topics
Co-chairs : Diána Bánáti (ILSI) and Eric Marin (DG Santé)
11:00
The strategy of the flavour industry on vanilla and vanilla extracts
Antoine Kastler (EFFA, Belgium)
11:20
Assuring food integrity in the spice and herb supply chain
Clare Menezes (McCormick, UK)
11:40
Non-tariff barriers in global agri-food trade – Implications for food security
Michael Haverty (The Andersons Centre, UK)
12:00
New breeding techniques: science, regulation and analytical challenges
Mathieu Rolland (ANSES, France)
Examples of recent or still ongoing crises will be scrutinised by experts of the concerned food sector. Explanation on the issues, understanding of underlying mechanisms and solutions to prevent such crises from a regulatory or an industrial point of view will be presented.
12:30
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13:30
Lunch Break
Satellite Events
13:30
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14:30
Seminar
Thermo Fisher
Seminar Bruker
FI Demo Corner
Poster Session
13:45
Food Integrity with New Analytical Technologies: unlocking the truth
Amanda Manolis (Thermo Fisher, USA)
13:45
NMR-based tools for food authenticity and quality control
Andrea Steck (Bruker, Germany)
13:30
Demonstration of approaches developed by the FoodIntegrity for assuring the integrity of the food chain
Solutions
Parallel Sessions
14:30
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16:00
Session 3
Complex foods: tools for food authenticity assessment
Session 4
The lab comes to the factory
Session 5
Transparency and trust in the food chain
Session 6
Standardisation: new initiatives
Co-chairs : Michele Suman (Barilla) & James Donarski (FERA)
14:30
Food proteomics as a novel tool to ensure the integrity of food: from targeted to untargeted approaches
Jens Brockmeyer (University Stuttgart, Germany)
14:50
Using chemical and DNA markers to authenticate manuka honey
Claire McDonald (Ministry for Primary Industries, New Zealand)
15:10
Authenticity and quality control of food by automated 1 H-NMR spectroscopy combined with multivariate statistics
Andrea Steck (Bruker BioSpin GmbH, Germany)
15:30
Evaluating the integrity of complex foods by combined methods. Case Study: bakery products containing chia, flax and sesame seeds.
Daniel Wunderlin (CONICET, Argentina)
Authenticity of complex food remains a key problem for industry as well as an analytical challenge for laboratories. Scientists face the difficulty to extract information from a mix of several ingredients, which might interfere during the analytical procedure. Furthermore processing often modifies the chemical composition of ingredients, so that it is very difficult to go up to the original information. New tools and solutions to address this challenge will be presented.
Co-chairs : Céline Lesueur (Danone) & Diego Luis García-González (CSIC)
14:30
F.I.S.HUB – A mobile app to verify fish species through a picture
Pier Luigi Acutis (Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle d'Aosta, Italy)
14:50
Portable authentication technologies - Their place in detecting spirit drinks fraud
Ian Goodall (The Scotch Whisky Research Institute, UK)
15:10
PhasmaFOOD: a new Generation optical food sensing device and an open software architecture delivering food-tech innovation
Yannick Weesepoel (RIKILT – Wageningen University, Netherland)
15:30
On-site analysis of individual pork carcasses for the predictions of quality parameters in Iberian ham
Ana Garrido Varo (Universidad de Cordoba, Spain)
A major demand in the food industry is to shorten the duration of analytical procedures so that results are given quicker and preferably before the food goes out of the factory. This trend has been supported by technological evolution in the last decades, from miniaturisation of analytical sensors to wireless communication. Handheld or in situ analytical tools that can be deployed in factories for assessing food authenticity will be presented in this session.
Co-chairs : Shefalee Loth (Which?) & Francis Butler (University College Dublin)
14:30
Data sharing as a solution to identify food issues early
Niels Lucas Luijckx (TNO, Netherlands)
14:50
Finding the needle in the haystack: preventing food fraud by comparing production volumes with trade volumes
Gerald A. Herrmann (Organic Services, Germany)
15:10
Key success factors for an information sharing system to prevent and detect food integrity issues: insights from a stakeholder consultation
Fien Minnens (Ghent University, Belgium)
15:30
Tracing Mediterranean high value food products: the REALMed approach
Carla Alegria (FCiências.ID – Associação para a Investigação e Desenvolvimento de Ciências, Portugal)
Food fraud can occur in the food supply chain in spite of the current procedures. Falsification of certificates, mislabelling and material imbalance are often reported by enforcement bodies or in the media. In parallel, consumers are requiring more transparency and, as a consequence, food producers have the same expectation from their suppliers. However there are a number of major obstacles that have to be overcome before true transparency can be implemented. What do we mean by transparency? What about proprietary concerns? What information does the consumer really want? This session will attempt to answer these and other related questions and present state of the art concepts, tools and methods for increasing transparency in the food chain...
Co-chairs : Selvarani Elahi (LGC) & Christophe Cavin (Nestlé)
14:30
A standardised definition of terms relating to food authenticity and food fraud
Petter Olsen (Nofima, Norway)
14:50
Guidance document towards food authenticity, an initiative of ILSI Europe
Bert Pöpping (ILSI, Belgium)
15:10
How can food safety standards help improve food fraud mitigation?
Bruno Séchet (IFS, France)
15:30
Food fraud and food authenticity: new definitions and a new approach
Joanne Carter (IFAAO - True Foodies Only, USA)
15:50
Discussion panel
The concept of food fraud has been developed in the past ten years. In spite of many different initiatives, no official definition has been agreed on a global scale so far. Several organisations such as Codex, ISO, CEN, ILSI, GFSI to name a few are developing initiatives in this area. This session will review current standardisation actions in this field, and address when and how a harmonised definition of all the terms related to food integrity can be expected.
16:00
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16:30
Coffee Break In Poster Area
16:30
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18:00
Session 7
Molecular biology approaches to food integrity
Session 8
Available IT tools using data for food authentication
Session 9
Organic food authentication
Session 10
Tools and needs for the future: gap analysis, interactive workshop
Co-chairs : Elena Maestri (SITEIA Parma) & Thomas Charrier (Eurofins)
16:30
The future of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) analysis in testing food authenticity
Ed Haynes (FERA, UK)
16:45
NGS-based metabarcoding for the analysis of plant food products.
Maria Logacheva (Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Russia)
17:00
A novel metabarcoding approach to complex foods: using the Oxford Nanopore’s MinION to fight fraud
Sarah Helyar (Queen's University of Belfast, UK)
17:15
Miniaturized device for isothermal DNA amplification
Joana Carvalho (International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), Spain)
17:30
Authentication of shrimp products in the UK
Amanda Naaum (Institute for Global Food Security, Queen’s University Belfast, UK)
DNA analytical techniques have boomed in the last ten years: previously complex and costly sequencing devices have been replaced by a new generation of equipment enabling new fast and cheap DNA analyses, and new applications for checking food integrity. Speakers will present new uses of these technologies applied either to allergenic substance detection, species identification or microbiological flora.
Co-chairs : Peter Whelan (FSAI) & Petter Olsen (Nofima)
16:30
Using the Food Authenticity Knowledge Base: case studies for food operators and regulators
Alain Maquet (JRC, European Commission)
16:40
The Food Authenticity Research Network (FARNHub) for sharing and accessing information on food authenticity activities
Philippe Vermeulen (CRA-W, Belgium)
16:50
The Food Authenticity Network; the one-stop-shop that can help protect the integrity of your food
Selvarani Elahi (LGC, UK)
17:00
Food Integrity “Industrial Integration Tools”
Michele Suman (Barilla SpA – Advanced Laboratory Research, Italy)
17:10
Food fraud Early Warning System
James Donarski (Fera Ltd, UK)
17:20
Development of a food fraud media monitoring system
Hans Marvin (RIKILT Wageningen University and Research, Netherlands)
17:30
Food authenticity risk assesment : 30 years of experience enhanced through data mining
Eric Jamin (Eurofins, France)
IT applications have invaded our daily life. These new IT technologies, including for instance web-based sharing platforms or big data tools, have also been applied to the food sector and are very helpful for assuring food authenticity along the supply chain. Speakers will present the IT tools they have developed and discuss how they can be used in the daily life of a food producing company for mitigating the risk of food fraud.
Co-chairs : Peter Rinke (SGF) & Jean-François Morin (Eurofins)
16:30
Is it organic? What do existing analytical techniques have to offer and how close are we to implementing them?
Simon Kelly (IAEA, Austria)
16:45
Enhanced fraud prevention through combining supply chain and satellite information – reducing vulnerabilities in organic certification
Annette Sutter (Organic Services, Germany)
17:00
Authentication of organic vegetables from real farms using stable isotope ratios: a legislative initiative from the Andalusian government. Indirect impact on new fertilizers legislation.
Jose Manuel Moreno-Rojas (IFAPA, Spain)
17:15
Bio-Fraud-Scan: concept for a method to check authenticity of organic foods via pesticide metabolites
Mikko Hofsommer (Gfl Berlin, Germany)
17:30
Panel discussion
Organic food authentication is a challenge from an analytical and traceability point of view. However the need for tools and methods to ensure integrity in this sector has never been so big, because of high prices, a demand exceeding largely the offer and perfectible controlling tools. New approaches will be presented for improving organic food integrity, either on the analytical side or in traceability. Blockchains will be addressed in another session.
Co-ordinator : Saskia Van Ruth (RIKILT, Wageningen)
16:30
Open discussion
moderated by Saskia Van Ruth (Rikilt, Wageningen University)
Satellite Event
Plenary Session
18:10
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18:45
Seminar G.A.S.
Session 11
Young science: short talks on food integrity
18:10
Testing of flavours inducing volatiles and off-smells in food and beverages without sample pre-treatment
Thomas Wortelmann (G.A.S. Gesellschaft für analytische Sensorsysteme)
Co-chair : Didier Montet (CIRAD) & Lola Pérez Marín (UCO)
18:10
Towards an NMR-based monitoring of coffee origin? An industrial case-study.
Raphaël Recht (Aerial, France)
18:15
MRM-MS of marker peptides distribution as a tool for authentication of single-cut meat products
Ilona Klosowska-Chomiczewska (Gdansk University of Technology, Poland)
18:20
New rapid GC-MS method versus conventional pycnometry: what is a real alcoholic strength of these spirits and liqueurs?
Michal Stupak (UCT Prague, Czech republic)
18:25
Is it organic? Compound-specific stable isotope ratio analysis for authenticity testing of organically grown vegetables
Vlastimil Novak (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)
18:30
Using ambient mass spectrometry and chemometrics to rapidly determine poultry production system authenticity
Nicholas James Birse (Institute for Global Food Security, Queen’s University Belfast, UK)
18:35
A novel multi-platform high resolution mass spectrometry non-targeted approach facing extra virgin olive oil adulteration
Daniele Cavanna (Barilla G. & R. Fratelli S.p.A., Italy)
Young scientists (less than 36) are invited to present the results of their research related to food integrity in a short and dynamic way (5 minute long).
18:45
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19:30
Break
19:30
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23:00
Conference Dinner
Satellite Events
08:15
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08:45
Seminar Sciex
Seminar Agilent
08:15
VS: Targeted proteomics to tackle the difficult ones: authentication of closely related species and semi-untargeted MS approaches
Jens Brockmeyer (University Stuttgart, Germany)
08:15
VS: Metabolomic profiling of Manuka honey
Emmanuel Sauvard (Agilent Technologies, France)
Forward Look
Parallel Sessions
09:00
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10:30
Session 12
Industry are the main victims of food fraud? A debate on a new paradigm
Session 13
Targeted versus non-targeted: problems and solutions
Session 14
Will Blockchain really solve our food fraud problems?
Moderator : Lucy Foster (DEFRA)
Paul Brereton (Queen's University of Belfast)
Shefalee Loth (Which?, UK)
Beate Kettlitz (FoodDrinkEurope, Belgium)
Eric Marin (DG RTD, European Commission)
Debate
It has been commonly acknowledged that the first and main victims of food frauds are consumers. They are certainly the high profile victims and obviously need to be protected, but are they the most affected? What about the honest industry whose livelihood is being threatened by unfair competition from malevolent actors in the food chain? Who protects supports or even acknowledges their plight? Have we produced a system that, due to this lack of protection, actually encourages food fraud as the only means of survival? Do we need a paradigm shift in our thinking in terms of cause and solutions? Speakers will debate this emerging idea which has the potential to radically modify the approach to food fraud from both a political and regulation point of view.
Co-chairs : Jeff Moore (USP) & Tom Fearn (UCL)
09:00
Challenges in moving from targeted to non-targeted mass spectrometric methods for food fraud analysis
Michele Suman (Barilla SpA – Advanced Laboratory Research, Italy)
09:15
To target or not to target? Definitions and nomenclature for targeted versus non-targeted analytical food authentication
Kristian Holst Laursen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)
09:30
Investigations on the comparability of fingerprinting data – Learn to walk before you run
Carolin Lörchner (German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Germany)
09:45
Development of unbiased and multi users classification tools based on non-targeted analysis: the crucial role of the statistical equivalence of the “scaled NMR spectra” in the validation process
Vito Gallo (Politecnico di Bari, Italy)
10:00
A guidance for the analytical validation of untargeted methods: results, criticisms and perspectives from the food integrity project
Marco Arlorio (Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale “A. Avogadro”, Italy)
10:15
Discussion panel
Non-targeted analyses have been considered as a paradigm shift in the field of analytical testing. Fast screening methods would now be available. Moreover unknown adulterations can be detected. But these technologies have faced difficulties in their application on a routine basis. This session will address the current problems of non-targeted analysis, like creation and sharing of authentic sample databases, lack of validation standards, diversity of food samples to be taken into account and analytical reproducibility. Ongoing initiatives for fixing these issues will be presented, as well as the role and respective advantages of targeted and non-targeted analyses in the control plans of food companies.
Co-chairs : Niels Lucas Luijckx (TNO) + Neil Buck (General Mills)
09:00
Introduction by the chair
Niels Lucas Luijckx (TNO, Netherlands)
09:10
Will the use of blockchain technology ensure food traceability and authenticity?
Petter Olsen (Nofima, Norway)
09:30
Blockchain / DLT and product authenticity in the agri-food sector - Sustainable, artisanal and other specialist categories
Fiona Delaney (Origin Chain, Ireland)
09:50
Laboratory 4.0 and blockchain: hypes, buzzwords - Confusion or added value? – Views of an instrument supplier
Christoph Jansen (Mettler-Toledo, Schweiz )
10:10
Discussion panel and polls
There is a lot of hype surrounding this new technology. It is seen as a revolution in many areas, including traceability in the food industry where crises and scandals have recently occurred. But will Blockchain really solve all of these problems? This critical session will confront opinions from different stakeholders. Can Blockchains really be trusted? Can they efficiently gather all the stakeholders along the supply chain of a food sector? Can they really ensure that your food is not adulterated? Are they sustainable in a long term? Our speakers will debate.
10:30
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11:00
Coffee Break in Poster Area
Plenary Session
11:00
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13:00
Session 15
Forward look: future research and innovation needs for the food sector
Co-chairs : Paul Brereton (Queen's University of Belfast) and Jean-François Morin (Eurofins)
11:00
Food research in Horizon Europe
Razvan Anistoroaei (DG RTD, European Commission)
11:15
EIT strategic agenda for innovation
Mercedes Groba (EIT Food)
11:30
Authent-Net Joint Strategic Research Agenda
Lucy Foster (DEFRA, Ministry of Agriculture, Authent-Net)
11:45
Outcome of future priorities workshop/gap analysis
Saskia Van Ruth (Rikilt, Wageningen University, Netherlands)
12:00
Discussion Panel
12:20
Summing up of FoodIntegrity
Michèle Lees (FI Advisory board)
12:35
Awards
12:45
Closing remarks
Paul Brereton, Jean-François Morin et al. (FoodIntegrity)
The last session of the FoodIntegrity conference will give the audience a summary of all the topics addressed during these two days and the tools and solutions which can be implemented in the food sector. Horizon 2020 will come to an end in two years. The European Commission is already thinking about the next framework programme (FP9) “Horizon Europe”. It has launched consultations in which research and innovation stakeholders, as well as the general public, can provide input. Keynote speakers will provide a multi-sector view on future research needs and plans in combatting food fraud and ensuring the integrity of our food.
End of Conference
13:00
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14:00
Lunch Break
14:00
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18:00
Visit of Eurofins Labs
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